“Sons of Enoch” Chapter 27 (Wallam Olam) Red Record

(The City of Tenochtitlan)

Red Record ( Wallum Olam) red record

Long before the Europeans arrived on the eastern shores of  North America, there was a tribe of people living in the land, now known as the Delaware Indians. In more recent years, and as long as the Europeans have been here, the neighboring tribes as far south as Florida refereed to the Delaware  as the “Grandfathers”  or the “Lenni Lenape “.   Though Lenni Lenape in the Lenape, “Algonquian Indian”  language means  “ Original People “, their own tradition, and records  reveal a very different story. The “Red Record”, or Story of the Grandfathers, Delaware Indians is well-preserved and is known in the Indian tongue as the “Wallum Olam”.

The Wallum Olam pictured above is the oldest written account of the migration and colonization of any ” Native American people”, spanning almost a hundred generations and beginning with a written account of Noah’s flood.

From the Pre-Columbian American Religions, p. 162

In the long chain of tribes along the east coast, one ethnic group stands out, not only in the European written sources but also in the judgment of the Indians themselves. This remarkable group was the Delaware, called in their own language the Lenni Lenape. They had a special status in the eyes of many other Indian peoples: they were reverenced as the “grandfathers,”  representatives, after a fashion, of authority and legality.

One of the things that we today have learned from these writings as far as what the term “Grandfathers” meant to those tribes who later came to co-exist the continent with the already flourishing Delaware, is not exactly what earlier historians and anthropologist understood it to mean.  Because of the wonderfully preserved written account of the Delaware, and remnant discoveries of a long-lost civilization along the Mississippi River basin, truth of who the first now known inhabitants of the continent were became overpowering but clear.

Though the term “Grandfathers” and other reverencing, and honorable terms used by the neighboring tribes to describe the Delaware came well deserved, as the ensuing revelation of exactly who the Delaware had to conquer when first coming into the new land portrays , it also tells of just how “Earned” the sentiments must truly be.

A View of Cahokia One of the members of this organization — United States archaeologist H.M. Brackenridge — described the ruins in his own words. He examined the great pyramid of Cahokia in 1811-12, and we quote his fascinating record taken from A. J. Conant’s Footprints of Vanished Races (pp. 56-58) — In order for us to form a correct idea of these mounds and pyramids, it will be necessary to give the reader a general idea of the terrain in which they are located. This great American plain consists of extensive aluvial terrain that extends from the tributaries of the Mississippi River, from Kaskaskia to the Chakol River, some 190 miles in length and about seven miles in width; several rivers wind their way through the area; the earth of this region is extremely fertile and is not harmed by the constant overflowing of the mighty Mississippi. Many LAKES are scattered about through this area, which abound in fishes, and in the autumn of the year arrive many wild birds. This valley is capable of supporting a population greater than any other part of the entire Mississippi Valley. The branches of the great river offer proof that this area once supported an ENORMOUS POPULATION. If, for example, the modern city of Philadelphia were to be abandoned, the traces of human existence would not be more numerous! The author goes on to say — The immense number of mounds and the quantity of human bones found everywhere on the surface gives ample evidence that this valley was once filled with towns and peoples. Almost all the land seems to be a superb resting place for its original inhabitants. Most outstanding of all are THE PYRAMIDS AND THEIR MOUNDS. A group of them is located about 12 miles to the north of Cahokia and another is located about 12 miles to the south of the river. There are MORE THAN 150 PYRAMIDS of various sizes. The western branch of the Mississippi also contains A CONSIDERABLE NUMBER. A more detailed description of the pyramids to the north of the Cahokia River, which I visited in 1811, will give you a good idea of them all. I crossed the Mississippi coming from St. Louis and passed through a forest that ran along the edge of the river and entered a plain. After 15 minutes I found myself in the midst of some mounds. From the distance they looked like hay-stacks standing up in a meadow. One of the largest, which I climbed, had a base of 200 feet in circumference. The form of this mound was almost square, although there was evidence of the erosion caused by wind and water over the centuries. The level top had enough room to contain seven hundred men in a standing position. The view from this pyramid was beautiful beyond belief. You could see a plain with some wooded groves and some isolated trees: to the right the prairie extended to the horizon, to the left I could see the Cahokia River winding its way to the Mississippi. Within my view I was able to count FIFTY-FIVE PYRAMIDS and numerous mounds of various sizes. These all formed a semicircle. I continued walking along the branch of the Cahokia and passed by EIGHT MORE PYRAMIDS within the distance of four miles before arriving at a larger connecting tributary. When I arrived at the base of the MAIN PYRAMID, I was astonished! I thought I must be viewing the great pyramid of Egypt. It was truly wonderful to behold! The construction of this one must have required the labor of thousands of men and many years of continuous labor! From:    http://www.hope-of-israel.org/aztec.htm   (From the Mississippi to Mexico — The Great Migration of the Aztecs!)

In 1519,  Hernando Cortez, and his hoard of 600 soldiers landed ship on the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, and discovered an established, well advanced society who called themselves the Aztec. Later, Cortez, after herding the Aztecs, who were polytheistic, and unable to understand the Spanish language, into great masses and shouting the principles of the Gospel of Christ at them, mistook the seemingly indifferent response of the Aztec as rejection of the Gospel. This military authoritative means of  spreading the Gospel of Christ not only revealed the Spanish hoard’s misunderstanding of the message and Christ himself, but unfortunately resulted in catastrophic annihilation of an absurd amount of human lives.

Google Image from / www2.dsu.nodak.,edu

At first encounter, and until Cortez decided it was time for him to make converts to Christianity, the Aztecs greeted the Spaniards peacefully.  In fact, as some of the Aztec Traditional legends told them of a god  who would return to them one day, they first perceived erroneously that he had returned through Cortez.

Ensuing are excerpts from Bernal Diaz del Castillo:

The first hand account of Bernal Díaz del Castillo‘s True History of the Conquest of New Spain paints a portrait of a noble leader who struggles to maintain order in his kingdom after he is taken prisoner by Hernán Cortés. In his first description of Moctezuma, Díaz del Castillo writes:

“The Great Montezuma was about forty years old, of good height, well proportioned, spare and slight, and not very dark, though of the usual Indian complexion. He did not wear his hair long but just over his ears, and he had a short black beard, well-shaped and thin. His face was rather long and cheerful, he had fine eyes, and in his appearance and manner could express geniality or, when necessary, a serious composure. He was very neat and clean, and took a bath every afternoon. He had many women as his mistresses, the daughters of chieftains, but two legitimate wives who were Caciques[N.B. 2] in their own right, and only some of his servants knew of it. He was quite free from sodomy. The clothes he wore one day he did not wear again till three or four days later. He had a guard of two hundred chieftains lodged in rooms beside his own, only some of whom were permitted to speak to him.” (Díaz del Castillo 1568/1963: 224–25)

When Moctezuma was allegedly killed by being stoned to death by his own people “Cortés and all of us captains and soldiers wept for him, and there was no one among us that knew him and had dealings with him who did not mourn him as if he were our father, which was not surprising, since he was so good. It was stated that he had reigned for seventeen years, and was the best king they ever had in Mexico, and that he had personally triumphed in three wars against countries he had subjugated. I have spoken of the sorrow we all felt when we saw that Montezuma was dead. We even blamed the Mercederian friar for not having persuaded him to become a Christian.” (Díaz del Castillo 1568/1963: 294)[7]    End Wiki

(The City of Tenochtitlan) http://www.hope-of-israel.org/aztec.htm

Paul Willis; part of chapter 9,  Sons of Enoch…much more to come.

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